Grass-Fed Beef FAQ's


What does “grass-fed and grass-finished beef” mean?

Is grass-fed beef better for me?

What is CLA?


What’s so special about your grass-fed beef?


Does grass-fed beef taste different?


What’s so bad about non-grass-fed beef?


How do I prepare grass-fed beef?





What does “grass-fed and grass-finished" mean?

Grass-fed beef is from animals that have never eaten anything other than their mother’s milk and grass…their entire lives. However, not all so-called “grass-fed” animals enjoy grass their entire lives. Many products are deceptively marketed as “grass-fed,” when grass is only a part of their diet. (Please look for 3rd party certifications like our American Grassfed Association)

Not to worry, Homegrown cows are not only grass-fed, they are “grass-finished,” which means they enjoy the free range lifestyle for the first year or so of their lives and then are rotated to new open pastures on our finishing ranch, consisting of flat, green, easy-living pastures where they continue to graze and eat what they are meant to eat: natural, organic grasses. That's it. As a result, you don’t have to worry about hormones, antibiotics, or nitrogen-laced corn product contamination in the meat you eat!
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Is grass-fed beef better for me?

You bet. Our local grass-fed beef is lower in fat, calories, and cholesterol than grain-fed meats and higher in beta carotene (Vitamin A), conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and Omega-3 fatty acids, which help to reduce cholesterol, diabetes, cancer and high blood pressure and improve brain function. And you’ve heard of that nasty E. coli….in our grass-fed beef, the risk of infection is virtually eliminated.

It’s not only better for you; it’s better for the cows, the environment and the farmer.
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What is CLA?

Conjugated Linoleic Acid, CLA, is a group of polyunsaturated fatty acids found in beef. Over the past two decades, several health benefits have been attributed to CLA including the blocking of cancer growth and the reduction of hardening of the arteries, onset of diabetes and fat body mass. A recent study determined that women with significant CLA in their diets lowered their risk of breast cancer by 60 percent.
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What’s so special about your grass-fed beef?

Well, for starters, it’s Homegrown! Born and raised in the oak-lined meadows of Palomar Mountain, our cattle feed and graze on native, sustainable California grasses. After about a year, they are moved to our family-owned finishing ranch, where they continue to feed on even more natural, organic grasses.

Our partner, the Mendenhalls of Mendenhall Ranch, retain strict control over the conditions, the feed, and the humane treatment of the animals through the entire process. The beef is processed in an exclusive USDA-certified processing plant here in Southern California. It is always fresh, never frozen.

When it comes to beef, simpler is better and our simple methods produce responsibly raised beef of the highest quality with unmatched flavor and health benefits.
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Does grass-fed beef taste different?

Grass-fed beef definitely tastes different…it tastes great, like true, tender, rich beef is meant to taste.
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What’s so bad about non-grass-fed beef?

Don’t get us started. Animals fattened in feedlots, known as Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFO), incur endless stress and abuse. They can become afflicted with a variety of disorders, including subacute acidosis, a painful condition that causes them to kick at their bellies, lose their appetite and eat dirt. In reaction, the animals are given chemical additives and antibiotics.

Also, animals raised in CAFOs are given diets designed to boost their productivity, featuring hormones, animal proteins, genetically modified grain and soy and can even be given feed that contains by-product feedstuff including municipal garbage, stale pastry, chicken feathers and candy. Everything that is in their feed is passed on to you when you eat non-grass-fed beef. Who wants to throw that on the grill?

And if you’re concerned about the environment, consider this: Animals raised in CAFOs deposit large amounts of waste in a small amount of space. The manure must be collected, transported and dumped, causing ground and water pollution. Further pollution is caused by the gasoline- and diesel-powered equipment used to farm commercial grains.

There’s a human cost, as well. CAFOs offer low-paid, stressful farm work and small family farms often find themselves unable to compete with “factory farming” operations.
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How do I prepare grass-fed beef?

Our Homegrown grass-fed beef is significantly lower in fat than what you may be used to. To enjoy all the tender, rich flavor, you’ll have to pay a little extra attention when cooking.

Here are a few simple steps to take:

1. Bring your meat to, or close to, room temperature.
2. Sear and brown the outside on high heat – not burned, but caramelized.
3. Turn down the heat to medium and finish cooking to the desired internal temperature. In general, the more rare, the better! (See the chart below.)
4. Use a meat thermometer to measure the internal temperature or cut into the meat to check its doneness.
5. The final crucial step is to remove the meat from the heat and let it rest for 5-15 minutes. Cover your meat with aluminum foil – loosely for rare and tightly for a little more done.
6. Enjoy your Homegrown grass-fed, flavorful, healthy beef. And we’ll see you again real soon. We’re sure of it.

Internal Temperature Table
Remove from heat/Ideal temperature after resting/USDA recommendation
Rare -- 120º-130º/125º-130º/140º
Medium-Rare -- 130º-135º/130º-140º/150º
Medium -- 135º-150º/140º-150º/160º
Medium-Well -- 150º-165º/155º-165º/170º (not recommended)

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